Innovation in Action

Asset Integrity Consultants
Case Study

R&D of a Remote Mobile Rail Tracking Machine

R&D of a Remote Mobile Rail Tracking Machine Location Nelson Point, WA Services Project Overview Mincka was commissioned to design and fabricate a remote vehicle capable of inspecting the condition of the rail tracks used by various types of rail mounted machines. Previous Next The Challenges The client was concerned about safety issues that could arise during the manual inspection of the rail tracks used by the rail mounted machines. The goal of the project was to reduce the exposure of the rail track inspectors to potential hazards. These included the uncontrolled release of stored energy in the rail retainers and environmental hazards due to high temperatures and dust. In addition, this type of inspection is very time-consuming, since the inspector has to walk the rail track to look for any defects. The Solution Mincka assembled a mechanical and electronic engineering team to design a complete solution. We designed a remote vehicle that has high-precision cameras at the front and on both sides, a customizable viewing range, high image quality, and a rail guidance system sized to standard rail specifications. In addition, a high-accuracy positioning system with two independent GPS and a collision prevention system using a panoramic camera and proximity detection sensors, was created. Finally, a control station that provides a set of monitoring and configuration tools to remotely command the vehicle was developed. The Impact We eliminated the exposure that our client’s inspection personnel have to the potential release of stored energy and to various environmental hazards. We also reduced inspection time by being able to measure the vertical alignment of the rail tracks and identify defects remotely via video. The comprehensive capabilities of our solution allowed the client to substantially improve their key safety metrics across the board.

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engineering australia
Case Study

Material Recovery Plan Upgrade

Material Recovery Plan Upgrade Location Smithfield, NSW Services Project Overview Mincka was commissioned to analyse and certify the structural upgrade of a material recovery plant, Smithfield, Australia.  Mincka conducted an optimization process and provided a structural report in order to certify the structure. The insights provided by Mincka helped the client reduce costs, address the physical constraints inherent in this project and ensure the proper and safe operation of the structure. Previous image Next image The Challenges The client wanted us to optimize the structural members that support the waste handling machines for the proposed structure. Unique to this project was that there were geometrical constraints to placing the structural members, because the existing infrastructure was near the upgraded section of the plant. The Solution At Mincka we always start a project by understanding the engineering problem, so we asked for the operational parameters; material bulk density, conveyors’ speed and dimensions, as well as how the machinery operates. Since these are existing facilities, we were also able to get access to geotechnical information and as-built drawings. Once all of the physical limitations of the structure were identified, we proceeded with the global geometry of the structure via CAD and point cloud data. We then created a Structural Model of the Asset. We applied the load cases and load combination into our structural model, based on relevant standards including AS1170.0 AS1170.1 AS1170.2 AS1170.4. We then checked the internal loads of each member to make sure that the model was coherent. We iterated a number of different sized steel members  to optimize the solution in terms of strength, cost, and serviceability. In addition, we checked the dynamic response of the structure under operational conditions, including the vibration of the machine, in order to prevent undesirable outcomes. The Impact We provided valuable insights and identified the optimal cross-section for the steel members, as well as the ideal width and topology for the truss support, which resulted in a significant reduction in the customer’s fabrication costs. We enhanced the lateral strength of the structure with the addition of cross-bracing and knee braces in critical spots, ensuring proper operation. Recommendations provided resulted in the optimum solution, that was both the most practical and the most economical.

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risk management
Case Study

Rom Bin

Rom Bin Location Emerald, QLD Services Project Overview The ROM Bin structure at central Queensland, required a modification to continue operating under a new loading methodology. The new method required loading the ROM Bin in two ways, as follows: By side tipping into the ROM Bin, when a road train drives over the grizzly structure By front tipping with a CAT 992 Loader and a Liebherr T282B GB mining truck Mincka provided an in-depth assessment of the condition of the concrete hopper structure, along with the design of a new grizzly structure, which is modular in nature, and for which constituent parts can be replaced when required. Previous Next The Challenges The mechanical and geometrical properties of the bin were unknown. The bin was constructed more than 20 years ago, so accurate information was unavailable for our analysis. In addition, the client wanted a new easy-to-install and easy-to-repair grizzly beam system, so special considerations were required in the design stage to meet the stated requirements. The Solution Concrete Conditions Mincka conducted visual inspections to identify any obvious concrete defects such as cracks, honeycombed areas, and staining from corrosion/efflorescence. A comprehensive delamination survey was also carried out on concrete surfaces that were easily accessible, to identify internally cracked/drummy cover concrete, and any concrete at risk of spalling. The slab and walls were scanned using Proceq Live ground penetrating radar (GPR) equipment, to locate reinforcement bars and to determine concrete cover depth. A Proceq Silver Schmidt live rebound hammer was used to test the hardness of accessible concrete wall surfaces. Surface hardness can be used non-destructively to estimate in situ concrete strength. Mincka assessed the concrete carbonation, cement content and chloride ingress on the 12 core samples, taken from various locations across the structure. Chloride ion ingress was determined by testing the core samples, typically by taking 3-4 discrete depth slices, according to AS1012.20. Geometry Laser scan measurements were taken in the ROM Bin, in order to overcome the lack of information regarding its overall geometry. From the laser measurements a detailed CAD model was created, which allowed us to proceed to the design stages of the project. Design Several meetings and field inspections were held. Having comprehensive knowledge with regards to risk assessment, governance, and mine operations allowed us to quickly establish the key features required for the design. After the initial design, Mincka conferred with the customer to get feedback and to ensure we were addressing their requirements and meeting their expectations. The finite element models for both the concrete bin and grizzly beam arrangement were then completed. The structural design was carried out as per Australian standards, including AS1170, AS4100 and AS5100. Design A complete Bill of Materials and structural drawings were delivered, providing a clear and detailed outline of the structural members required to construct the new grizzly system. The Impact Our testing provided valuable insights regarding the condition of the ROM Bin concrete structure, which lead to better, more accurate decision-making for the stakeholders. The new loading methodologies increased both the production and the capacity at the mine. A new grizzly beam system will be installed into the ROM Bin, with an excellent return on investment.

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